Veganism with a soy allergy?

2011/08/76a2a_allergy_cooking_405908515_681bbeba2c

question by Megan : Veganism with a soy allergy I am about to become a vegan. I have been a vegetarian for four years now, and I think that I would enjoy even more of the health benefits (and good karma) if I gave up animal products in their totality. My problem is that I have a soy allergy, so I tin not eat anything that is soy / tofu. Are there ways for me to get the Necessary Ca without farm or soy, etc.-based dairy replace?I know that there is cereal humour, almond milk, etc. that I could quietly drink. Which one would you recommend? Are there any cheese alternative I could try?My main concern would be stick and egg substitutes. Do any exist that have neither soy nor animal products? I do not eat eggs on their own usually, but I would form some form of replacing for cooking (if there is one!)Thank you so much to anyone who can help me! Best Answer:

Answer by Desiree
First of all, congratulations on making this conclusion! I’ll be volition to aid you in any manner opening (consciousness people to e-mail me with any questions at purp1e_ninja@yahoo.com). Concerning curd-people foods – of class it’s opening, although it will certainly require statesman attempt than it would if you did not have the allergy. You tin breakthrough “stick” that is made from veggie lipide (the marque name will depend on where you live, but at the WalMart in my burg, it’s Earth Balance). Just brand certain to cheque ingredient. In regard to humour, I personally have earnings that I do not variety grain humor (or soy milk, for that substance), but others love it, so it’s up to you. Personally, I adoration the almond milk. I’m not certain about cease, but I imagine that vegetarian, tofu-free ceased tin be earnings. : D I desired I’ve helped you, and good luck

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7 Responses to “Veganism with a soy allergy?”

  1. Nancy says:

    Rice milk is often fortified and, its also sold in different flavors like vanilla or chocolate.
    Earth Balance Natural Buttery Spread can be used for baking and as a spread and it works well as a butter substitute.

    Also try this website it has lots of vegan recipes from different parts of the world and most don’t ask for soy products!! http://www.ivu.org/recipes/

  2. Angela Q says:

    I am not a vegan, but I am on something of a restricted diet. I suggest you explore new foods and find new ways to prepare the ones you are familiar with, rather than looking for processed substitutes for foods you can no longer eat. There are no real vegan substitutes for dairy that are nutritionally equivalent. If you like rice milk or almond milk, use them to cook with or as a beverage. Don’t count on them for a nutritional wallop.

    Most cheese substitutes contain either soy, milk protein or both. Besides, they are disgusting.

    There isn’t really a substitute for eggs, though sometimes a little extra starch can make a recipe work. It’s better to find recipes that work without them. ∠°)

  3. Jennifer says:

    First of all congrats on becoming Vegan.And do not worry about soy.It is not healthy anyway specially not the highly progressed soy products you can find everywhere like faux meat,cheese and so on.You will get plenty of calcium from dark leafy greens.

    There are plenty of soy free and vegan foods you can eat,First of all fruit and veggies,nuts and seeds and whole grains.That’s what you should focus on anyway.

    You can buy almond and rice milk.I like doing my own almond milk once in a while.Just put them in a blender with water and you have fresh almond milk without anything added.

    Earth Balance butter is soy free and tastes just like the real thing.

    Daiya cheese is soy free.You can buy it at whole foods.It is pretty good for faux cheese,

    Eggs in baking you can always substitute with egg replacer or applesauce for example.I cant really think of a tofu free scrambled egg right now but I am sure if you google it you will find something.

    I hope it helped a little and have fun

  4. [Scrubs] Vanilla Bear says:

    Congrats on the veganism. It’s difficult at first but it gets easier.

    There’s plenty of calcium to be found in dark leafy green vegetables.

    The thing about cow milk is, the high protein content actually saps calcium from your blood and bones.

    A substitute for eggs in cakes and stuff it 1/3 cup of applesauce per 1 egg.

  5. Kim N says:

    If you stay away from fake: meats, dairy, etc. it’s easy to avoid soy.

    Vegetarian Society Info. Sheet – Calcium
    http://www.vegsoc.org/info/calcium.html

    — PCRM’s Recipe Archive
    http://www.pcrm.org/health/recipes/recipe_archive.html
    — Simple Vegan Recopies
    http://www.simpleveganrecipes.co.uk/
    — Vegan Recopies
    http://vegweb.com/index.php?action=recipes

  6. kc says:

    I can tell that you are a very conscientious person that wishes to be kind to animals. The problem arises when you let your philosophy dictate your diet. The human body has some very specific requirements that are impossible to meet without animal products. There are synthetic substitutes but they are not ideal and there is much controversy about whether they are sufficient for the body’s needs or may actually break down into harmful substances once ingested.

    Before making this decision, you should read up on B12 requirements and synthetic supplements to decide for yourself whether you are willing to risk it. At the very least, you should consider how difficult it is to nourish the body without animal products and be prepared to work harder on your diet to meet those needs. Most vegans do use soy as a meat alternative because it is so high in protein, but there are dangers associated with soy products as well. Consider yourself lucky that your allergy prevents you from contracting some of the modern epidemics that are associated with soy products. You will need to be very careful to avoid food additives made from soy because vegan/vegetarian products can contain more of the harmful food additives than standard fare. Most food additives are made from GMO corn, but there are quite a few common ones made from GMO soy.

    Another consideration is that you are willingly undertaking a diet that will require many “substitutions” thus being less natural. There are egg substitutes and even cheese substitutes, but it seems strange that you would be interested in a diet that disallows these foods you enjoy. The case against animal cruelty in modern industrial farms is easy enough to see and very hard to tolerate, but that isn’t the only side to the meat debate. Eating animal products from animals that were allowed to live a natural life on an actual farm is certainly not the same thing as eating industrial chicken house eggs from hens that never see sunlight or grass. Eating ground beef from the modern CAFO is not the same as eating pasture finished beef from a local farmer. Drinking raw, organic milk from pastured cows is not the same thing as drinking industrial hormone- and antibiotic-laden milk from cows fed GMO corn in huge windowless milking barns. Buying food from local farmers is the more natural circle of life and necessitates no artificial supplements or substitutions and condones no animal cruelty. Some of these local farmers are responsible for keeping heritage livestock breeds from becoming extinct by raising and breeding them.

    A traditional diet of whole foods raised naturally is the best possible diet for the human body. We are at the top of the food chain whether we like it or not. The human body has certain vitamin and mineral requirements whether we like it or not. The vegan lifestyle is only possible through modern technology and chemistry. That makes vegans dependent on synthetic man-made substitutions to maintain life, which is the definition of an unnatural choice.

    Whatever you decide, I hope that you make an informed decision and pay attention to the way you feel. Any diet will work in the short-term, but your body will tell you if this particular lifestyle doesn’t agree with you. I have known vegans that had to give it up after a short while because they just felt bad on that particular diet. The same goes for the typical SAD (standard American diet) and the raw food diet. Ultimately, you should listen to your body when deciding the best diet for you and let your health be the deciding factor.

    If you want to also consider the environment, read up on sustainable farming and vermiculture. Also of consideration is the damaging effect that GMO monoculture crops have on the environment, without which food additives and supplements cannot be made. It is also important to note that today’s farmers are at the forefront of sustainable energy production in America by incorporating wind farms and solar panels to their land. This issue is huge and requires a lot of research to understand all of the ramifications of every possible option.

  7. Joy says:

    More people are allergic to cow’s milk than soy milk (in the US, it’s about 5% only)but in your case, it’s different. Anyway, some veggies are rich in calcium such as spinach, okra, and broccoli so there won’t be a problem on your plan to go vegan.

    Calcium is important for strong bones (especially to women to avois osteoporosis) and teeth, weight reduction, prevention of heart diseases and colon cancer. Aside from calcium, there are also nutrients needed by our body to keep it healthy such as magnesium (which also helps strengthen bones), several vitamins (A, B, C, D, E), iron, protein, and carbohydrates.

    I’m not a vegan since it’s hard for me to resist meat so what I do is to eat some green leafy veggies. And recently, I also started drinking wheatgrass juice which I bought from http://www.wheatgrasscan.com/. I’m loving their wheatgrass Ready-To-Drink (RTD) since it’s hassle-free because no preparations were involved (except shaking the can). I highly recommend this one!

    Good luck to going vegan :)

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